28th October

Welcome to the Eightfold Year. Every day a different painting appears, along with moon phases, saints days, seasonal plants and other festive celebrations.

You can find out more about the concept of the Eightfold Year here.

We hope you enjoy this website. We will be adding content as we go through the year and welcoming your feedback and suggestions.

Onwards and Upwards!

tolsta-beach-%289%29.jpg

Tolsta Beach, Isle of Lewis, Autumn 2011: Saul Hughes

Moon Phases, October 2014:
First Quarter – October 1, 19:32
Full Moon – October 8, 10:51
Last Quarter – October 15, 19:12
New Moon – October 23, 21:57
First Quarter – October 31, 2:48

-

CURRENT MOON

Ragged-Kingdom-plot.jpg

A Ragged Kingdom, Liverpool, 2011: Saul Hughes

Saint's Days and Observances:
Abdias of Babylon
Abgar V of Edessa (Eastern Orthodox Church)
Eadsige
Fidelis of Como (Roman Catholic Church)
Faro
Godwin of Stavelot
Job of Pochayiv (repose) (Eastern Orthodox Church)
Jude the Apostle (Western Christianity)
St Jude the Brother of the Lord
Lord of Miracles (Lima)
Simon the Zealot (Western Christianity)

Festival:
Day of the Establishment of an Independent Czecho-Slovak State, celebrates the independence of Czechoslovakia from Austria-Hungary in 1918. (Czech Republic and Slovakia)
International Animation Day (ASIFA)
Ochi Day (Greece, Cyprus and the Greek communities)
Prefectural Earthquake Disaster Prevention Day (Gifu Prefecture)
Youth Pledge Day or Hari Sumpah Pemuda (Indonesia)

Flowering Now by Saul Hughes: Common Fleabane
Inula Dysenterica.
Family: Composite. (Asteraceae).
Gaelic Name: Lus Bui Na Ndreabcaidh.

Oct-3a.jpg

Also known as Pulicaria Dysenterica, Fleawort, Job’s Tears and Middle Fleabane.
This beautiful plant is often found in masses along the banks of rivers or the in moisture laden meadows of these Isles, and as its names suggests it was much used for driving away fleas and other irritable insects. Its other most famous use is also found in its Latin name of ‘Dysenterica’ were the plant was used to treat dysentery.

Oct-3b.jpg

The ancient Irish used this plant to drive away the way flea to as reflected in the Gaelic name ‘Lus Bui Na Ndreabcaidh’ which loosely means ‘The Yellow flower plant that drives away the human flea’. The names Job’s Tears stems from Arab traditions regarding the plant supposed use by the Biblical Job in treating his outward sores wounds.

Oct-3c.jpg

The plant is much loved by insects especially by various species of the micro moths that inhabit these Isles.*

Also on this day:

1834 – The Battle of Pinjarra is fought in the Swan River Colony in present-day Pinjarra, Western Australia. Between 14 and 40 Aborigines are killed by British colonists.

1835 – The United Tribes of New Zealand is established with the signing of the Declaration of Independence.

1922 – March on Rome: Italian fascists led by Benito Mussolini march on Rome and take over the Italian government.

1962 – Cuban Missile Crisis: Soviet Union leader Nikita Khrushchev announces that he had ordered the removal of Soviet missile bases in Cuba.

1965 – Nostra Aetate, the "Declaration on the Relation of the Church with Non-Christian Religions" of the Second Vatican Council, is promulgated by Pope Paul VI; it absolves the Jews of responsibility for the death of Jesus, reversing Innocent III's 760 year-old declaration.

2007 – Cristina Fernández de Kirchner becomes the first woman elected President of Argentina.

* All information regarding the uses of the plants is exactly for that informational purposes only, and that the author and owners of the web do not encourage anyone to be eating, or disturbing wild plants, but merely to admire them in their natural environment and to ponder on their rise and fall within human culture.