22nd October

Welcome to the Eightfold Year. Every day a different painting appears, along with moon phases, saints days, seasonal plants and other festive celebrations.

You can find out more about the concept of the Eightfold Year here.

We hope you enjoy this website. We will be adding content as we go through the year and welcoming your feedback and suggestions.

Onwards and Upwards!

Sun-Sets-Over.jpg

Sun Sets, Autumn 2008: Jamie Reid

Moon Phases, October 2014:
First Quarter – October 1, 19:32
Full Moon – October 8, 10:51
Last Quarter – October 15, 19:12
New Moon – October 23, 21:57
First Quarter – October 31, 2:48

-

CURRENT MOON

Over-There.jpg

Over There, Liverpool, 2011: Saul Hughes

Saint's Days and Observances:
Aaron the Illustrious (Syriac Orthodox Church)
Abercius of Hieropolis
Bertharius
Donatus of Fiesole
John Paul II
Mary Salome

Festival:
Earliest day on which Labour Day can fall, while October 28 is the latest; celebrated on the fourth Monday in October (New Zealand)
Earliest day on which Make a Difference Day can fall, while October 28 is the latest; celebrated on the fourth Saturday in October (United States)
Fechner Day, celebrated by Psychophysicists
International Stuttering Awareness Day (International)
Jidai Matsuri (Kyoto)

Flowering Now by Saul Hughes: Common Fleabane
Inula Dysenterica.
Family: Composite. (Asteraceae).
Gaelic Name: Lus Bui Na Ndreabcaidh.

Oct-3a.jpg

Also known as Pulicaria Dysenterica, Fleawort, Job’s Tears and Middle Fleabane.
This beautiful plant is often found in masses along the banks of rivers or the in moisture laden meadows of these Isles, and as its names suggests it was much used for driving away fleas and other irritable insects. Its other most famous use is also found in its Latin name of ‘Dysenterica’ were the plant was used to treat dysentery.

Oct-3b.jpg

The ancient Irish used this plant to drive away the way flea to as reflected in the Gaelic name ‘Lus Bui Na Ndreabcaidh’ which loosely means ‘The Yellow flower plant that drives away the human flea’. The names Job’s Tears stems from Arab traditions regarding the plant supposed use by the Biblical Job in treating his outward sores wounds.

Oct-3c.jpg

The plant is much loved by insects especially by various species of the micro moths that inhabit these Isles.*

Also on this day:

362 – A mysterious fire destroys the Temple of Apollo at Daphne outside Antioch.

1790 – Warriors of the Miami tribe under Chief Little Turtle defeat United States troops under General Josiah Harmar at the site of present-day Fort Wayne, Indiana, in the Northwest Indian War.

1844 – The Great Anticipation: Millerites, followers of William Miller, anticipate the end of the world in conjunction with the Second Advent of Christ. The following day became known as the Great Disappointment.

1910 – Dr. Crippen is convicted at the Old Bailey of poisoning his wife and is subsequently hanged at Pentonville Prison in London.

1926 – J. Gordon Whitehead sucker punches magician Harry Houdini in the stomach in Montreal.

1934 – In East Liverpool, Ohio, Federal Bureau of Investigation agents shoot and kill notorious bank robber Pretty Boy Floyd.

1966 – The Supremes become the first all-female music group to attain a No. 1 selling album (The Supremes A' Go-Go).

1975 – The Soviet unmanned space mission Venera 9 lands on Venus.

1999 – Maurice Papon, an official in the Vichy France government during World War II, is jailed for crimes against humanity.

* All information regarding the uses of the plants is exactly for that informational purposes only, and that the author and owners of the web do not encourage anyone to be eating, or disturbing wild plants, but merely to admire them in their natural environment and to ponder on their rise and fall within human culture.