1st January

Happy New Year!

Welcome to the Eightfold Year. Every day a different painting will appear, along with moon phases, saints days, seasonal plants and other festive celebrations.

You can find out more about the concept of the Eightfold Year here.

We hope you enjoy this website. We will be adding content as we go through the year and welcoming your feedback and suggestions.

Onwards and Upwards!

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Snowfall on Maria's Balcony, Liverpool, 2007: Jamie Reid

Moon Phases, January 2015:
Full Moon – January 5, 04:54
Third Quarter – January 13, 09:48
New Moon – January 20, 13:14
First Quarter – January 27, 04:49

Read more: http://www.universetoday.com/99591/moon-phases-and-dates/#ixzz2p6Q6mcAS

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CURRENT MOON


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Allotment in winter chill, Liverpool, December 2010: Jamie Reid

Saint's Day:
Basil the Great (January 2 in Catholicism)
Feast of the Circumcision (Eastern Orthodox Church)
Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus (Lutheran Church)
Feast of the Solemnity of Mary, the Octave Day of Christmas, considered a holy day of obligation in some countries. (Roman Catholic Church)
Fulgentius of Ruspe
Telemachus

Festival:
Constitution Day (Italy)
Day of the Establishment of the Slovak Republic (Slovakia)
Earliest day on which Handsel Monday can fall, while January 7 is the latest; celebrated on the first Monday of the year. (Scotland)
Independence Day, celebrates the independence of Brunei from United Kingdom in 1984.
Independence Day, celebrates the independence of Sudan from United Kingdom in 1956.
National Tree Planting Day (Tanzania)
The last day of Kwanzaa (United States)
New Year's Day
Triumph of the Revolution (Cuba)

Flowering Now by Saul Hughes: Cleavers
Galium Aparine.
Family. Rubiaceae.
Gaelic Name. Garbh Lus.

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A very common and well known plant, especially to children who delight in the clinging abilities of this plant. Also known as Goosegrass, Catchweed, Love-man, Barweed, Hedgeheriff, Robin run in the grass and Eriffe to name but a few, the majority of its folk names referring to its clinging nature, as its leaves are covered with tiny hooked bristles with which they will adhere to anything they come in contact with.
However the folk names of hedgeheriff and eriffe drive from the Anglo Saxon’Hedge rife’ meaning a tax gatherer or a robber as it would pluck the wool off the sheep as they passed it amongst the hedge row. The Ancient Greeks known it as Philanthropon because of its clinging nature and the folk name ‘love man’ is an Anglicized version of Philanthropon. The name Goosegrass is in reference to the fondness these birds have in eating it and at one time it was collected in large amounts for the feeding of poultry, horses, cows and sheep.

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The Name Galium derives from the Greek Gala (milk) as this herb was employed to make milk curdle instead of rennet. Aparine the name of this species is derived from the Greek Apario( to seize or lay hold of) again in reference to its clinging nature. The name of the natural order of plants this belongs to Rubiaceae means red from Rubia named after the Madder Rubia Tinctoria, and like this plant, it has red roots, which give a good red dye. This family contains over seventy genera and over four thousand species, including the coffee tree and Quinine, many of the plants of this family are noted for their beauty and fragrance of their blossoms.
The plant has many uses and was valued as an excellent coffee substitute, the seeds were gathered, dried and then roasted over a fire, and then used in the same way as coffee. The leaves were also used in making a soothing tea.

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Medicinally it is Diuretic(increases urine), Tonic, Vulnerary(wound healing) and Aperient (laxative). It was greatly employed for its curative powers against cancerous growths and tumours, a ointment being made from the stems and leaves and applied to the affected area by means of a poultice or a bandage whilst also drinking the expressed juices. The Hospital of St Vincent’s In Dublin had great success in treating chronic ulcers on the legs under the auspices of Dr Quinlan, the fresh herb being applied three times a day. The herb was also much used in spring juices and tonics, being used both internally as a cure all and pick me up, and externally against all kinds of cancerous growths, scurvy, scrofula, sun burn and even freckles. It was also considered very efficacious against epilepsy and colds of the head.
The crushed herb was also used as a remedy for the bites of insects, snakes and all other venomous creatures according to the herbalist Gerard, it was also used for stemming bleeding as the whole herb is slightly Astringent. The great herbalist Culpepper recommends it for ear ache.
The fresh herb is available all year round and it tends to blossom towards august, and a legend says they first burst into blossom when the Christian saviour was born. In Ireland the cleavers was used by the country girls as a rosary the small round seeds being used for the Hail Mary. *

Also on this day:

45 BC – The Julian calendar takes effect for the first time.

1600 – Scotland begins its numbered year on January 1 instead of March 25.

1801 – The dwarf planet Ceres is discovered by Giuseppe Piazzi.

1804 – French rule ends in Haiti. Haiti becomes the first black republic and second independent country on the American Continent after the U.S.

1808 – The importation of slaves into the United States is banned.

1898 – New York City annexes land from surrounding counties, creating the City of Greater New York. The four initial boroughs, Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, and The Bronx, are joined on January 25 by Staten Island to create the modern city of five boroughs.

1912 – The Republic of China is established.

1949 – United Nations cease-fire takes effect in Kashmir from one minute before midnight. War between India and Pakistan stops accordingly.

1957 – An Irish Republican Army (IRA) unit attacks Brookeborough RUC barracks in one of the most famous incidents of the IRA's Operation Harvest.

1959 – Fulgencio Batista, president of Cuba, is overthrown by Fidel Castro's forces during the Cuban Revolution

1983 – The ARPANET officially changes to using the Internet Protocol, creating the Internet.

1985 – The first British mobile phone call is made by Ernie Wise(!) to Vodafone.

1995 – The Draupner wave in the North Sea in Norway is detected, confirming the existence of freak waves.

* All information regarding the uses of the plants is exactly for that informational purposes only, and that the author and owners of the web do not encourage anyone to be eating, or disturbing wild plants, but merely to admire them in their natural environment and to ponder on their rise and fall within human culture.