16th November

Welcome to the Eightfold Year. Every day a different painting will appear, along with moon phases, saints days, seasonal plants and other festive celebrations.

You can find out more about the concept of the Eightfold Year here.

We hope you enjoy this website. We will be adding content as we go through the year and welcome your feedback and suggestions.

Onwards and Upwards!

Ritual-at-holy-well.jpg

Ritual at holy well, North Wales: Jamie Reid

Moon Phases, November 2014:
Full Moon – November 6, 22:23
Last Quarter – November 14, 15:15
New Moon – November 22, 12:32
First Quarter – November 29, 10:06

-

CURRENT MOON

Saint's Day:
Edmund of Abingdon
Eucherius of Lyon
Gertrude the Great (Roman Catholic church)
Margaret of Scotland

Festival:
International Day for Tolerance (International)
Icelandic Language Day or Dagur íslenskrar tungu

Flowering now: Meadow Buttercup
Meadow Buttercup.
Botanical Name. Ranunculus Acris.
Family. Ranunculaceae.
Gaelic Name. Cearban.
Also known as Crow foot, blister plant and crazy weed.
EFY-Nov-3-a.jpg
The gaelic name of the plant, Cearban, means raggy in regards to the general appearance of this plant, it’s botanical and family name Ranunculus comes from the Latin for little frog, due to this plants preference for wet grounds. The Name Acris refers to its unpleasant taste.
The buttercup is a member of the ranunculaceae family a group of plants that are all poisonous, especially to livestock, despite this it is popular amongst children for holding under the chin to see the bright yellow of this flower reflected on the skin, the brightness denoting how much one likes butter.
EFY-Nov-2b.jpg
The sap from the buttercup is known to cause contact dermatitis hence its name blisterwort and it was often used by beggars to blister their skin in order to arouse sympathy in passersby. Fisherman used to pour buttercup tea over the ground as it was believed to bring worms to the surface, and holding alrage buttercup to the neck on the night of a full moon or merely smelling it was meant to induce instant insanity, arising in its country name crazyweed.
Culpeper calls the herb Crowfoot, and recommends it as an ointment for the treatment of blisters, but strongly advises against its internal use as it “blistereth the tongue”.
The Irish on mayday used to rub this plant on cows udders to encourage milk production.
Two famous cases of poisoning are related to this plant, one being a man in France who drank a glass of juice made from buttercups and suffered sever colic and died the next day, the other was a sailor, who inhaled the fumes from the burning plant, which induced an epileptic attack in him which he had never had before, two weeks later he suffered another epileptic attack and died.*

Also on this day:

1532 – Francisco Pizarro and his men capture Inca Emperor Atahualpa.

1849 – A Russian court sentences Fyodor Dostoevsky to death for anti-government activities linked to a radical intellectual group; his sentence is later commuted to hard labour.

1938 – LSD is first synthesized by Swiss chemist Dr. Albert Hofmann at the Sandoz Laboratories in Basel, Switzerland.

1940 – Holocaust: In occupied Poland, the Nazis close off the Warsaw Ghetto from the outside world.

1940 – World War II: In response to Germany's leveling of Coventry, England two days before, the Royal Air Force bombs Hamburg

1988 – In the first open election in more than a decade, voters in Pakistan elect populist candidate Benazir Bhutto to be Prime Minister of Pakistan.

1997 – After nearly 18 years of incarceration, the People's Republic of China releases Wei Jingsheng, a pro-democracy dissident, from jail for medical reasons.

* All information regarding the uses of the plants is exactly for that informational purposes only, and that the author and owners of the web do not encourage anyone to be eating, or disturbing wild plants, but merely to admire them in their natural environment and to ponder on their rise and fall within human culture.