12th October

Welcome to the Eightfold Year. Every day a different painting appears, along with moon phases, saints days, seasonal plants and other festive celebrations.

You can find out more about the concept of the Eightfold Year here.

We hope you enjoy this website. We will be adding content as we go through the year and welcoming your feedback and suggestions.

Onwards and Upwards!

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Whale Bones, Hebrides, Autumn 2011: Saul Hughes

Moon Phases, October 2014:
First Quarter – October 1, 19:32
Full Moon – October 8, 10:51
Last Quarter – October 15, 19:12
New Moon – October 23, 21:57
First Quarter – October 31, 2:48

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CURRENT MOON

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Late Nasturtiums, Liverpool, 2011: Saul Hughes

Saint's Days and Observances:
Heribert of Cologne (private feast day)
Wilfrid of York

Festival:
Children's Day or Feast of Our Lady of Aparecida (Brazil)
Discovery of America by Columbus-related observances:
Descubrimiento de América (Mexico)
Día de la Hispanidad or Fiesta Nacional de España (Spain)
Día de la Raza, "Day of the Race" (Latin America)
Día de la Resistencia Indígena, "Day of Indigenous Resistance" (Venezuela)
Día de las Américas, "Day of the Americas" (Uruguay)
Día de las Culturas, "Day of the Cultures" (Costa Rica)
Discovery Day (the Bahamas)
Freethought Day (United States)
Independence Day, celebrates the independence of Equatorial Guinea from Spain in 1968.
Mother's Day (Malawi)
National Coming Out Day (United Kingdom)

Flowering Now by Saul Hughes: Forget Me Not
Botanical Name. Mysotis arvensis.
Family, Boraginaceae.
Gaelic Name, Lus Miola Gort. (bitter herb)

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The Botanical name of the beautiful tiny flowered plant Mysotis comes from the greek meaning mouse ear in reference to the soft down on its leaves, the Latin Name Arvensis means of the field.
Folk lore has Christ as a child sitting upon the lap of Mary looking into her eyes and wishing future generations to see the beauty thereof he waved his hand over the ground and blue forget me nots appeared and were named so as not to forget the sacred mother.

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Another origin of the name is a German tale of a Knight and his lady walking along a river bank picking flower when he stumbled and fell in, throwing a posy of this flower to his lasy and shouting forget me not, before he drowned.

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The plant was once used in the treatment of scorpion stings because the coiled stem of the plant resembled a scorpion.
Women would wear a posy of this flower so a loved one would not forget them, and freemasons wear them also in remembrance of fellow freemasons who died under the Nazi regime.*

Also on this day:

1216 – King John of England loses his crown jewels in The Wash, probably near Fosdyke, perhaps near Sutton Bridge

1692 – The Salem witch trials are ended by a letter from Massachusetts Governor William Phips.

1773 – America's first insane asylum opens for 'Persons of Insane and Disordered Minds' in Virginia.

1871 – Criminal Tribes Act (CTA) enacted by British rule in India, which named over 160 local communities 'Criminal Tribes', i.e. hereditary criminals. Repealed in 1949, after Independence of India.

1915 – World War I: British nurse Edith Cavell is executed by a German firing squad for helping Allied soldiers escape from Belgium.

1960 – Cold War: Nikita Khrushchev pounds his shoe on a desk at United Nations General Assembly meeting to protest a Philippine assertion of Soviet Union colonial policy being conducted in Eastern Europe.

1964 – The Soviet Union launches the Voskhod 1 into Earth orbit as the first spacecraft with a multi-person crew and the first flight without space suits.

1970 – Vietnam War: US President Richard Nixon announces that the United States will withdraw 40,000 more troops before Christmas.

1984 – Brighton hotel bombing: The Provisional Irish Republican Army attempt to assassinate Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and her cabinet. Thatcher escapes but the bomb kills five people and wounds 31.

2005 – The second Chinese human spaceflight Shenzhou 6 launched carrying Fèi Jùnlóng and Niè Hǎishèng for five days in orbit.

* All information regarding the uses of the plants is exactly for that informational purposes only, and that the author and owners of the web do not encourage anyone to be eating, or disturbing wild plants, but merely to admire them in their natural environment and to ponder on their rise and fall within human culture.